Story Writing Contests for teens

Guys, I’m incredibly excited to introduce Kate Coursey, winner of Scholastic’s PUSH novel contest, which is a great opportunity for teen writers (and appears to be run by DAVID FREAKING LEVITHAN). She’s here to tell you all a little bit about how it all works.

Kate Coursey has been editing professionally since 2010. She helped found Teen Eyes in 2011, working with clients from all over the world to perfect their manuscripts. As a YA author, she is represented by Edward Necarsulmer IV of Dunow, Carlson & Lerner, and her novel LIKE CLOCKWORK won Scholastic’s PUSH Novel Contest when she was 16 years old. In addition to having extensive experience as a freelance editor, Kate worked as an intern at Scholastic Press, where she read many agented and unagented submissions. She received the prestigious Sterling Scholar Grant in 2011 based on an extensive creative writing sample.

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Hi everyone!

My name’s Kate, and I’m an 18-year-old writer from Salt Lake City, Utah. John asked if I would stop by to talk about the PUSH Novel Contest. Run in conjunction with the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, the PUSH Novel Contest is the only (as far as I know) novel contest aimed at students in grades 7-12. I won it my junior year of high school and I cannot speak highly enough of the Scholastic team.

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Achiever | Noah Bunch wins writing contest  — The Courier-Journal
Achievement: Noah won first place in Kentucky's 2014 Letters About Literature writing contest for level 2, grades 7 and 8. He was the only local student to win an award this year.

Q&A

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Story writing contests for teens.

Story writing contests can raise your writing to a higher level and make other people appreciate it. In preparation for a contest, analyse what made previous winners succeed and try to learn about vocabulary, narration methods or other literary devices from their writing style (make sure they really fit your own writing, though). You will also get an incentive to continue writing if you manage to win the contest. A number of story contests are specifically for teenagers, reflecting their interests and problems.