Love story Writers Contest

Julie Kagawa's Immortal Rules Book Cover

Get a One-Year Column on Teen.com with the ‘Requiem’ Writing Contest!

by: Teen.com Editors on | in Books |

With Lauren Oliver‘s final installment of her Delirium trilogy, Requiem — releasing March 2013! — Teen.com partnered up with Figment and HarperTeen to give young writers the opportunity for the series’ author to read his/her work for a chance to win the ultimate prize: a two-day trip to the HarperTeen offices in New York City and a one-year book column on Teen.com!

THE CHALLENGE: Write a story in which love is dangerous (like in the Delirium trilogy).

MUST-KNOW INFO: You must be between 13 and 21 years of age to be eligible. Open only to residents of the 50 United States. Entries must be submitted by 11:59 pm on March 3, 2013. Once your story is submitted, it is considered your final, official entry. Any story that is changed after it is submitted may be subject to disqualification. The Teen.com column is unpaid, but you’ll score a byline, promotion for your Figment author page AND advanced copies of YA books to review!

Lauren Oliver will read all the entries and handpick the grand-prize winner herself!

HOW TO ENTER:
1. .
2. Create an account on Figment.com.
3. Start a new writing of 1, 500 words or less.
4. Tag your writing with RequiemContest on the Details tab.

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Q&A

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How long should your pencil be to write a story?

It should be just long enough to reach the page, but not so long as to tear the paper. You should get a ruler and carefully measure each of your pencils before you start writing, to be sure they are not too long or too short. Otherwise, you might get halfway through your story, and suddenly realize that for the past ten minutes you have been writing with a too short pencil, and there is nothing at all on the paper!